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The perils of mutual cancellation

The perils of mutual cancellation

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Israel-Palestine - The perils of mutual cancellation

It is hard to think of an area of political debate more emotionally charged than that of Israel and its relationship with the Palestinians. But it would be a step forward if there was free debate on the subject. That would open the possibility for misconceptions to be challenged rather than letting grievances fester.

Why the left needs free speech

Why the left needs free speech

ARTICLE

Rosa Luxemburg

The Stepford Wives was a movie that came out in 1972 and might not be very well remembered today but which nonetheless contributed a useful metaphor for describing certain aspects of our society. Briefly, the Stepford Wives were the possessed and submissive versions of their original human selves, surreptitiously transformed one by one and reappearing as empty husks of what they had once been.

Criminalizing Holocaust Denial Sets a Dangerous Precedent

Criminalizing Holocaust Denial Sets a Dangerous Precedent

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Criminalizing Holocaust Denial Sets a Dangerous PrecedentOn June 23, 2022, the Canadian government officially made Holocaust denialism a crime. This amendment to the Criminal Code was secretly tucked away in Bill C-19, Canada’s budget implementation act. Canadians hardly noticed it was there — we were too distracted by the budgetary provisions that we were promised would make life more affordable for us.

<i>Looking Backward</i> by Edward Bellamy: Is this 1888 vision of a year 2000 Utopia still relevant?

Looking Backward by Edward Bellamy: Is this 1888 vision of a year 2000 Utopia still relevant?

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Forty years after the Communist Manifesto eviscerated capitalism and predicted its demise, a relatively unknown American writer shot to fame with a fascinating blueprint for its replacement.

Edward Bellamy’s Looking Backward 2000 – 1887 was a literary, cultural, and political sensation. First published in 1888, it was an international hit and only the second U.S. novel to sell a million copies.